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Jul
5
Sat
The Pearl Fishers @ London Coliseum
Jul 5 @ 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

pearl_fishers

Cherished for its popular duet, The Pearl Fishers offers a compelling tale of friendship tested by love. Amid Bizet’s outpouring of memorable melodies, colourful orchestration and evocative choruses is a story that is not all sweetness and light. A painful love triangle exploring themes of desire and rejection, longing and loss, and religious strictures lies at the heart of this opera – themes explored in Penny Woolcock’s admired original 2010 production. From the mesmerising underwater paradise of its opening sequence to the reality of designer Dick Bird’s shanty town setting, Woolcock’s staging seeks to reveal the truth lurking beneath Bizet’s Orientalist confection.

While well-known as a film-maker of integrity and distinction, Woolcock has also made important forays into opera: in addition to The Pearl Fishers, she received plaudits for her staging of John Adams’s Doctor Atomic at ENO and the Metropolitan Opera. For this first revival of The Pearl Fishers, soprano Sophie Bevan, a former ENO Harewood Artist and a firm audience favourite, makes her role debut as Leïla. Vying for her affections as Nadir and Zurga are tenor John Tessier, who was a loveable Nemorino in Jonathan Miller’s The Elixir of Love at the London Coliseum, and current ENO Harewood Artist, baritone George von Bergen. Rising star conductor Jean-Luc Tingaud, a specialist in French 19th-century repertoire, makes his UK operatic debut with this eagerly awaited revival.

A co-production with the Metropolitan Opera, New York

Sung and surtitled in English. Revival supported by the Friends of ENO

Fidelio @ Garsington Opera at Wormsley
Jul 5 @ 3:15 pm – 7:15 pm

Fidelio-Garsington-Opera-2014-920x360

Written at a time of war and social upheaval, Fidelio, Beethoven’s only opera, both belongs to and transcends its time. One of the greatest operas in the repertoire, it has come to represent the individual’s struggle for love, truth and freedom from political oppression and has as much resonance today as it ever did. With the glowingly courageous figure of Leonore at its heart, who risks all to rescue her husband from the clutches of the evil Don Pizarro, Fidelio represents humanity’s ability to survive and triumph in the face of tyranny.

2014 is the 200th anniversary of the opera’s first performance in its final version and our new Artistic Director, Douglas Boyd, who made his debut with the company conducting John Cox’s acclaimed production of Fidelio in 2009

Grange Park Opera: La Traviata @ Grange Park Opera
Jul 5 @ 3:30 pm – 10:30 pm

TraviataBanner2

How can one go through life and not see La Traviata? Verdi’s opera is not just a three-handkerchief weepie – you need a whole box of tissues. The racy courtesan Violetta thinks she has at last found true love with Alfredo, but is it too late? In between are some of the most famous arias (singing along not allowed).

Maria Stuarda @ Royal Opera House
Jul 5 @ 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm

Maria Stuarda

Two queens become bitter rivals in Donizetti’s tragic opera, given a new staging by directors Patrice Caurier and Moshe Leiser.

Gaetano Donizetti’s historical opera Maria Stuarda was banned by the authorities in Milan after its 1835 premiere, due to its perceived inflammatory content. The opera lay neglected for over a hundred years until 1958, when a performance in Donizetti’s hometown of Bergamo re-introduced it to the opera repertory. Maria Stuarda has since grown steadily in popularity. It is recognized as containing some of Donizetti’s most moving music, including Mary’s confession duet with Talbot and her poignant aria in the final scene of the opera, as she calmly faces her approaching death.

Maria Stuarda provides a magnificent showcase for the two singers playing Mary and Elizabeth, particularly in their extended duet in Act II. Famous pairings for the roles of the regal cousins have included Joan Sutherland and Huguette Tourangeau, both of whom starred in the first production of Maria Stuarda at Covent Garden in 1977, and Janet Baker and Rosalind Plowright, who sang the roles for ENO.

 

Jul
6
Sun
Grange Park Opera: Queen of Spades @ Grange Park Opera
Jul 6 @ 2:30 pm – 9:30 pm

Queenofspades

One of the all-time favourites – and perfect for those nervous about opera. A sensational score, beautiful (and expensive) costumes, dramatic love scenes – and Prince Yeletsky’s love song which you will sing in the car all the way home. Will the Countess reveal the secret of the three cards that made her fortune? Will Hermann win Lisa? It’s worth a punt to find out.

Cosi Fan Tutte @ London Coliseum
Jul 6 @ 7:00 pm – 10:15 pm

cosi_fan_tutte

Così fan tutte – ‘women are all, and always, so’ – is Mozart and Da Ponte’s final comic masterpiece. Two young men are persuaded by a friend to test the virtue of their fiancées by means of a cruel deceit: they disguise themselves and then each attempts to seduce the others’ girlfriend. When the women succumb, virtue is crossed – perhaps even double-crossed. Love, lust and desire are played out in a world in which the boundaries between what is real and what is make-believe are blurred. Against the erotic pulse of Mozart’s sublime music, the characters act out a game of love which entangles them far more deeply than they could have thought, or perhaps would be willing to admit. Once the deceit is unmasked, can their lives really go on as before?

Improbable’s inspirational Phelim McDermott returns to direct Mozart’s classic six-hander following the recent triumphs of Philip Glass’s Satyagraha and The Perfect American at the London Coliseum. Ryan Wigglesworth, award-winning ENO Composer in Residence, conducts a strong cast led by ENO Harewood Artist Kate Valentine and internationally renowned mezzo Christine Rice as the duped fiancées, while outstanding baritone Roderick Williams (MedeaSunken Garden) plays the cynical Don Alfonso, who sets the deception in motion.

A collaboration with Improbable 
A co-production with the Metropolitan Opera, New York

Jul
7
Mon
Manon Lescaut @ Royal Opera House
Jul 7 @ 7:00 pm – 10:30 pm

manonlescat

Puccini’s first triumph returns to Covent Garden for the first time in 20 years in a new staging by Jonathan Kent.

Puccini’s publisher tried to prevent him from adapting Abbé Prévost’sL’Histoire du chevalier des Grieux et de Manon Lescaut – Massenet had already created a highly successful opera based on the novel. But Puccini was not to be dissuaded, claiming ‘a woman like Manon can have more than one lover’. Despite a troubled gestation (five librettists were engaged in the project), the premiere of Manon Lescaut in 1893 was Puccini’s first major triumph – a hit with critics and the public alike.

Jonathan Kent – director of The Royal Opera’s much-loved staging of Tosca – brings a new production of Manon Lescaut to Covent Garden. Puccini’s sumptuous, richly-coloured score is characterized by youthful vitality and filled with glorious melodies. Des Grieux expresses his passion for Manon in the Act I aria ‘Vedete? io son fedele’, lively dances evoke Manon’s luxurious life in Paris in Act II, while in the impassioned finale to Act III, ‘Pazza son!’, Des Grieux begs to be allowed to join the imprisoned Manon on her voyage to America. The opera culminates in Manon’s heartbreaking Act IV aria ‘Sola, perduta, abbandonata’, as she contemplates her impending death.

Jul
8
Tue
Grange Park Opera: Queen of Spades @ Grange Park Opera
Jul 8 @ 3:30 pm – 10:30 pm

Queenofspades

One of the all-time favourites – and perfect for those nervous about opera. A sensational score, beautiful (and expensive) costumes, dramatic love scenes – and Prince Yeletsky’s love song which you will sing in the car all the way home. Will the Countess reveal the secret of the three cards that made her fortune? Will Hermann win Lisa? It’s worth a punt to find out.

The Cunning Little Vixen @ Garsington Opera at Wormsley
Jul 8 @ 5:45 pm – 9:15 pm

The-Cunning-Little-Vixen-Garsington-Opera-2014-920x360

When a forester takes a vixen cub into his home, little does he realise what confusion and disorder this wild creature will create. A fantastical and beautiful story unfolds to take both the vixen and her lonely guardian on a transformational journey through emptiness, chaos, passion and ultimate self-discovery.

Perhaps the only opera inspired by a sharply observed and humorous comic strip, The Cunning Little Vixen is far from being cute or infantile. Set to the composer’s own libretto, Janáček extends and deepens the comic’s depiction of the inevitable cycle of life and death, writing music of enormous sensitivity, warmth and perception to a plot which addresses our own search for fulfilment, validation, and redemption. Conductor Garry Walker makes his debut with Garsington Opera, while Daniel Slater, director of Garsington’s  2013 production of Die Entführung aus dem Serail, returns to explore one of the most significant works of the 20th century.

Maria Stuarda @ Royal Opera House
Jul 8 @ 6:30 pm – 9:15 pm

Maria Stuarda

Two queens become bitter rivals in Donizetti’s tragic opera, given a new staging by directors Patrice Caurier and Moshe Leiser.

Gaetano Donizetti’s historical opera Maria Stuarda was banned by the authorities in Milan after its 1835 premiere, due to its perceived inflammatory content. The opera lay neglected for over a hundred years until 1958, when a performance in Donizetti’s hometown of Bergamo re-introduced it to the opera repertory. Maria Stuarda has since grown steadily in popularity. It is recognized as containing some of Donizetti’s most moving music, including Mary’s confession duet with Talbot and her poignant aria in the final scene of the opera, as she calmly faces her approaching death.

Maria Stuarda provides a magnificent showcase for the two singers playing Mary and Elizabeth, particularly in their extended duet in Act II. Famous pairings for the roles of the regal cousins have included Joan Sutherland and Huguette Tourangeau, both of whom starred in the first production of Maria Stuarda at Covent Garden in 1977, and Janet Baker and Rosalind Plowright, who sang the roles for ENO.

Jul
9
Wed
Grange Park Opera: Don Quichotte @ Grange Park Opera
Jul 9 @ 3:30 pm – 10:30 pm

DonQuiche

For his last opera, Massenet was clearly dwelling on the big themes in life: love, death, and how to turn someone down nicely. Based on Cervantes’ tale of the eponymous knight, his sidekick, Sancho Panza and much worshipped la belle Dulcinée, it’s funny, uplifting and tragic all at the same time. What’s not to like?

Vert-Vert @ Garsington Opera at Wormsley
Jul 9 @ 5:15 pm – 8:45 pm

Vert-Vert-Garsington-Opera-2014-920x360

How could anyone resist an opera that opens with a tragicomic funeral for a deceased parrot held by the pupils of a girls’ convent school? The girls – this is a French convent so they know a thing or two – decide that their beloved pet must be replaced in some form and select the hopelessly innocent young man Valentin to be the happy recipient of all the doting attention they used to lavish on the parrot.

In the experienced hands of director Martin Duncan (Il Turco in Italia, Garsington Opera 2011), Garsington present a new translation of this enchanting work by conductor David Parry. Full of intoxicating melody and sparkling wit, this continuation of our Offenbach thread is the “Mozart of the Champs-Élysées” at his most charming.

La Bohème @ Royal Opera House
Jul 9 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
La Bohème @ Royal Opera House | London | England | United Kingdom

La bohème got a lukewarm reception when it had its premiere in 1896, but its fortunes almost immediately changed. Giacomo Puccini’s romantic depiction of bohemian Paris, with memorable music and a love story drawn from everyday life, has captivated audiences round the world, making La bohèmeone of the best-loved of all operas. It was first performed in Covent Garden in 1897 and has had over 500 performances here since.

John Copley’s production recreates Paris in the 1830s, from the lively Latin Quarter, where hawkers and traders ply their wares, to a drafty attic where impoverished artists live. Rodolfo and Mimì’s love story is given moving expression through Puccini’s score, from their first meeting in Act I to their final, poignant scene together in Act IV. These moments of emotional intensity are contrasted with the colourful spectacle of the Café Momus and surrounding streets, which present a cross-section of Parisian society in all its noise and vibrancy.

Jul
10
Thu
Grange Park Opera: Queen of Spades @ Grange Park Opera
Jul 10 @ 3:30 pm – 10:30 pm

Queenofspades

One of the all-time favourites – and perfect for those nervous about opera. A sensational score, beautiful (and expensive) costumes, dramatic love scenes – and Prince Yeletsky’s love song which you will sing in the car all the way home. Will the Countess reveal the secret of the three cards that made her fortune? Will Hermann win Lisa? It’s worth a punt to find out.

Fidelio @ Garsington Opera at Wormsley
Jul 10 @ 5:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Fidelio-Garsington-Opera-2014-920x360

Written at a time of war and social upheaval, Fidelio, Beethoven’s only opera, both belongs to and transcends its time. One of the greatest operas in the repertoire, it has come to represent the individual’s struggle for love, truth and freedom from political oppression and has as much resonance today as it ever did. With the glowingly courageous figure of Leonore at its heart, who risks all to rescue her husband from the clutches of the evil Don Pizarro, Fidelio represents humanity’s ability to survive and triumph in the face of tyranny.

2014 is the 200th anniversary of the opera’s first performance in its final version and our new Artistic Director, Douglas Boyd, who made his debut with the company conducting John Cox’s acclaimed production of Fidelio in 2009

Ariadne auf Naxos @ Royal Opera House
Jul 10 @ 7:30 pm – 10:30 pm

AriadneaufNaxos

Ariadne auf Naxos playfully combines two very different art forms: tragic opera and romantic farce. The result is a richly textured work that examines the role of art in society, and contrasts true love with cheerful promiscuity. Richard Strauss originally conceived Ariadne auf Naxos as part of a large-scale arrangement of Molière’s play Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme. After initial performances in 1912, he abandoned the material from Molière and wrote a new operatic Prologue. The second version of Ariadne auf Naxos had its premiere in 1916.

Christof Loy’s eye-catching production draws on an eclectic range of styles, from 18th-century elegance to 1980s grunge, reflecting the richness of Strauss’s score. The opera is filled with passion and colour, from the intense lyricism of the Composer’s paean to music and the richly scored love duet for Ariadne and Bacchus, to Zerbinetta’s show-stopping aria ‘Großmächtige Prinzessin’. Other highlights include Ariadne’s lyrical arias and the robust, folk-like ensembles for Zerbinetta’s comedy troupe.

Jul
11
Fri
Maria Stuarda @ Royal Opera House
Jul 11 @ 7:30 pm – 10:15 pm

Maria Stuarda

Two queens become bitter rivals in Donizetti’s tragic opera, given a new staging by directors Patrice Caurier and Moshe Leiser.

Gaetano Donizetti’s historical opera Maria Stuarda was banned by the authorities in Milan after its 1835 premiere, due to its perceived inflammatory content. The opera lay neglected for over a hundred years until 1958, when a performance in Donizetti’s hometown of Bergamo re-introduced it to the opera repertory. Maria Stuarda has since grown steadily in popularity. It is recognized as containing some of Donizetti’s most moving music, including Mary’s confession duet with Talbot and her poignant aria in the final scene of the opera, as she calmly faces her approaching death.

Maria Stuarda provides a magnificent showcase for the two singers playing Mary and Elizabeth, particularly in their extended duet in Act II. Famous pairings for the roles of the regal cousins have included Joan Sutherland and Huguette Tourangeau, both of whom starred in the first production of Maria Stuarda at Covent Garden in 1977, and Janet Baker and Rosalind Plowright, who sang the roles for ENO.

Jul
12
Sat
Grange Park Opera: Queen of Spades @ Grange Park Opera
Jul 12 @ 3:30 pm – 10:30 pm

Queenofspades

One of the all-time favourites – and perfect for those nervous about opera. A sensational score, beautiful (and expensive) costumes, dramatic love scenes – and Prince Yeletsky’s love song which you will sing in the car all the way home. Will the Countess reveal the secret of the three cards that made her fortune? Will Hermann win Lisa? It’s worth a punt to find out.

La Bohème @ Royal Opera House
Jul 12 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
La Bohème @ Royal Opera House | London | United Kingdom

La bohème got a lukewarm reception when it had its premiere in 1896, but its fortunes almost immediately changed. Giacomo Puccini’s romantic depiction of bohemian Paris, with memorable music and a love story drawn from everyday life, has captivated audiences round the world, making La bohèmeone of the best-loved of all operas. It was first performed in Covent Garden in 1897 and has had over 500 performances here since.

John Copley’s production recreates Paris in the 1830s, from the lively Latin Quarter, where hawkers and traders ply their wares, to a drafty attic where impoverished artists live. Rodolfo and Mimì’s love story is given moving expression through Puccini’s score, from their first meeting in Act I to their final, poignant scene together in Act IV. These moments of emotional intensity are contrasted with the colourful spectacle of the Café Momus and surrounding streets, which present a cross-section of Parisian society in all its noise and vibrancy.

The Cunning Little Vixen @ Garsington Opera at Wormsley
Jul 12 @ 6:45 pm – 10:15 pm

The-Cunning-Little-Vixen-Garsington-Opera-2014-920x360

When a forester takes a vixen cub into his home, little does he realise what confusion and disorder this wild creature will create. A fantastical and beautiful story unfolds to take both the vixen and her lonely guardian on a transformational journey through emptiness, chaos, passion and ultimate self-discovery.

Perhaps the only opera inspired by a sharply observed and humorous comic strip, The Cunning Little Vixen is far from being cute or infantile. Set to the composer’s own libretto, Janáček extends and deepens the comic’s depiction of the inevitable cycle of life and death, writing music of enormous sensitivity, warmth and perception to a plot which addresses our own search for fulfilment, validation, and redemption. Conductor Garry Walker makes his debut with Garsington Opera, while Daniel Slater, director of Garsington’s  2013 production of Die Entführung aus dem Serail, returns to explore one of the most significant works of the 20th century.

Jul
13
Sun
La Bohème @ Royal Opera House
Jul 13 @ 11:00 am – 2:00 pm
La Bohème @ Royal Opera House | London | England | United Kingdom

La bohème got a lukewarm reception when it had its premiere in 1896, but its fortunes almost immediately changed. Giacomo Puccini’s romantic depiction of bohemian Paris, with memorable music and a love story drawn from everyday life, has captivated audiences round the world, making La bohèmeone of the best-loved of all operas. It was first performed in Covent Garden in 1897 and has had over 500 performances here since.

John Copley’s production recreates Paris in the 1830s, from the lively Latin Quarter, where hawkers and traders ply their wares, to a drafty attic where impoverished artists live. Rodolfo and Mimì’s love story is given moving expression through Puccini’s score, from their first meeting in Act I to their final, poignant scene together in Act IV. These moments of emotional intensity are contrasted with the colourful spectacle of the Café Momus and surrounding streets, which present a cross-section of Parisian society in all its noise and vibrancy.

Fidelio @ Garsington Opera at Wormsley
Jul 13 @ 6:00 pm – 10:00 pm

Fidelio-Garsington-Opera-2014-920x360

Written at a time of war and social upheaval, Fidelio, Beethoven’s only opera, both belongs to and transcends its time. One of the greatest operas in the repertoire, it has come to represent the individual’s struggle for love, truth and freedom from political oppression and has as much resonance today as it ever did. With the glowingly courageous figure of Leonore at its heart, who risks all to rescue her husband from the clutches of the evil Don Pizarro, Fidelio represents humanity’s ability to survive and triumph in the face of tyranny.

2014 is the 200th anniversary of the opera’s first performance in its final version and our new Artistic Director, Douglas Boyd, who made his debut with the company conducting John Cox’s acclaimed production of Fidelio in 2009

Ariadne auf Naxos @ Royal Opera House
Jul 13 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm

AriadneaufNaxos

Ariadne auf Naxos playfully combines two very different art forms: tragic opera and romantic farce. The result is a richly textured work that examines the role of art in society, and contrasts true love with cheerful promiscuity. Richard Strauss originally conceived Ariadne auf Naxos as part of a large-scale arrangement of Molière’s play Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme. After initial performances in 1912, he abandoned the material from Molière and wrote a new operatic Prologue. The second version of Ariadne auf Naxos had its premiere in 1916.

Christof Loy’s eye-catching production draws on an eclectic range of styles, from 18th-century elegance to 1980s grunge, reflecting the richness of Strauss’s score. The opera is filled with passion and colour, from the intense lyricism of the Composer’s paean to music and the richly scored love duet for Ariadne and Bacchus, to Zerbinetta’s show-stopping aria ‘Großmächtige Prinzessin’. Other highlights include Ariadne’s lyrical arias and the robust, folk-like ensembles for Zerbinetta’s comedy troupe.

Jul
14
Mon
Maria Stuarda @ Royal Opera House
Jul 14 @ 7:30 pm – 10:15 pm

Maria Stuarda

Two queens become bitter rivals in Donizetti’s tragic opera, given a new staging by directors Patrice Caurier and Moshe Leiser.

Gaetano Donizetti’s historical opera Maria Stuarda was banned by the authorities in Milan after its 1835 premiere, due to its perceived inflammatory content. The opera lay neglected for over a hundred years until 1958, when a performance in Donizetti’s hometown of Bergamo re-introduced it to the opera repertory. Maria Stuarda has since grown steadily in popularity. It is recognized as containing some of Donizetti’s most moving music, including Mary’s confession duet with Talbot and her poignant aria in the final scene of the opera, as she calmly faces her approaching death.

Maria Stuarda provides a magnificent showcase for the two singers playing Mary and Elizabeth, particularly in their extended duet in Act II. Famous pairings for the roles of the regal cousins have included Joan Sutherland and Huguette Tourangeau, both of whom starred in the first production of Maria Stuarda at Covent Garden in 1977, and Janet Baker and Rosalind Plowright, who sang the roles for ENO.

Jul
15
Tue
La Bohème @ Royal Opera House
Jul 15 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
La Bohème @ Royal Opera House | London | England | United Kingdom

 La bohème got a lukewarm reception when it had its premiere in 1896, but its fortunes almost immediately changed. Giacomo Puccini’s romantic depiction of bohemian Paris, with memorable music and a love story drawn from everyday life, has captivated audiences round the world, making La bohèmeone of the best-loved of all operas. It was first performed in Covent Garden in 1897 and has had over 500 performances here since.

John Copley’s production recreates Paris in the 1830s, from the lively Latin Quarter, where hawkers and traders ply their wares, to a drafty attic where impoverished artists live. Rodolfo and Mimì’s love story is given moving expression through Puccini’s score, from their first meeting in Act I to their final, poignant scene together in Act IV. These moments of emotional intensity are contrasted with the colourful spectacle of the Café Momus and surrounding streets, which present a cross-section of Parisian society in all its noise and vibrancy.

Jul
16
Wed
Maria Stuarda @ Royal Opera House
Jul 16 @ 6:30 pm – 9:15 pm

Maria Stuarda

Two queens become bitter rivals in Donizetti’s tragic opera, given a new staging by directors Patrice Caurier and Moshe Leiser.

Gaetano Donizetti’s historical opera Maria Stuarda was banned by the authorities in Milan after its 1835 premiere, due to its perceived inflammatory content. The opera lay neglected for over a hundred years until 1958, when a performance in Donizetti’s hometown of Bergamo re-introduced it to the opera repertory. Maria Stuarda has since grown steadily in popularity. It is recognized as containing some of Donizetti’s most moving music, including Mary’s confession duet with Talbot and her poignant aria in the final scene of the opera, as she calmly faces her approaching death.

Maria Stuarda provides a magnificent showcase for the two singers playing Mary and Elizabeth, particularly in their extended duet in Act II. Famous pairings for the roles of the regal cousins have included Joan Sutherland and Huguette Tourangeau, both of whom starred in the first production of Maria Stuarda at Covent Garden in 1977, and Janet Baker and Rosalind Plowright, who sang the roles for ENO.

Jul
17
Thu
La Bohème @ Royal Opera House
Jul 17 @ 7:30 pm – 10:30 pm
La Bohème @ Royal Opera House | London | England | United Kingdom

 La bohème got a lukewarm reception when it had its premiere in 1896, but its fortunes almost immediately changed. Giacomo Puccini’s romantic depiction of bohemian Paris, with memorable music and a love story drawn from everyday life, has captivated audiences round the world, making La bohèmeone of the best-loved of all operas. It was first performed in Covent Garden in 1897 and has had over 500 performances here since.

John Copley’s production recreates Paris in the 1830s, from the lively Latin Quarter, where hawkers and traders ply their wares, to a drafty attic where impoverished artists live. Rodolfo and Mimì’s love story is given moving expression through Puccini’s score, from their first meeting in Act I to their final, poignant scene together in Act IV. These moments of emotional intensity are contrasted with the colourful spectacle of the Café Momus and surrounding streets, which present a cross-section of Parisian society in all its noise and vibrancy.

Jul
18
Fri
Maria Stuarda @ Royal Opera House
Jul 18 @ 7:30 pm – 10:15 pm

Maria Stuarda

Two queens become bitter rivals in Donizetti’s tragic opera, given a new staging by directors Patrice Caurier and Moshe Leiser.

Gaetano Donizetti’s historical opera Maria Stuarda was banned by the authorities in Milan after its 1835 premiere, due to its perceived inflammatory content. The opera lay neglected for over a hundred years until 1958, when a performance in Donizetti’s hometown of Bergamo re-introduced it to the opera repertory. Maria Stuarda has since grown steadily in popularity. It is recognized as containing some of Donizetti’s most moving music, including Mary’s confession duet with Talbot and her poignant aria in the final scene of the opera, as she calmly faces her approaching death.

Maria Stuarda provides a magnificent showcase for the two singers playing Mary and Elizabeth, particularly in their extended duet in Act II. Famous pairings for the roles of the regal cousins have included Joan Sutherland and Huguette Tourangeau, both of whom starred in the first production of Maria Stuarda at Covent Garden in 1977, and Janet Baker and Rosalind Plowright, who sang the roles for ENO.

Jul
19
Sat
La Bohème @ Royal Opera House
Jul 19 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm
La Bohème @ Royal Opera House | London | England | United Kingdom

La bohème got a lukewarm reception when it had its premiere in 1896, but its fortunes almost immediately changed. Giacomo Puccini’s romantic depiction of bohemian Paris, with memorable music and a love story drawn from everyday life, has captivated audiences round the world, making La bohèmeone of the best-loved of all operas. It was first performed in Covent Garden in 1897 and has had over 500 performances here since.

John Copley’s production recreates Paris in the 1830s, from the lively Latin Quarter, where hawkers and traders ply their wares, to a drafty attic where impoverished artists live. Rodolfo and Mimì’s love story is given moving expression through Puccini’s score, from their first meeting in Act I to their final, poignant scene together in Act IV. These moments of emotional intensity are contrasted with the colourful spectacle of the Café Momus and surrounding streets, which present a cross-section of Parisian society in all its noise and vibrancy.

La Bohème @ Royal Opera House
Jul 19 @ 7:30 pm – 10:30 pm
La Bohème @ Royal Opera House | London | United Kingdom

La bohème got a lukewarm reception when it had its premiere in 1896, but its fortunes almost immediately changed. Giacomo Puccini’s romantic depiction of bohemian Paris, with memorable music and a love story drawn from everyday life, has captivated audiences round the world, making La bohèmeone of the best-loved of all operas. It was first performed in Covent Garden in 1897 and has had over 500 performances here since.

John Copley’s production recreates Paris in the 1830s, from the lively Latin Quarter, where hawkers and traders ply their wares, to a drafty attic where impoverished artists live. Rodolfo and Mimì’s love story is given moving expression through Puccini’s score, from their first meeting in Act I to their final, poignant scene together in Act IV. These moments of emotional intensity are contrasted with the colourful spectacle of the Café Momus and surrounding streets, which present a cross-section of Parisian society in all its noise and vibrancy.